Broken and Beloved


Here we are, the broken,

Waiting while we praise

Praying for Your hand, oh God,

To heal, to help, to raise

Your people from their fallen ways

 

Here we are, the blessed,

Watching for Your grace

Praying for Your love to change

Our hearts, our heads, our hands

Your children need to learn Your ways

 

We are beloved and broken,

Children of the living God

Marked by grace, transformed by love

Your kingdom come today we pray

 

Here we are, beloved,

Washed in the blood of Christ

Praying for clean hearts and hands

To serve, to teach, to reach

Your lost sheep, Your broken lambs.

 

We are beloved and broken

Children of the living God

Saved from sin, changed within

Work Your will in us we pray

 

We are beloved and broken

Our God can make us whole

We are beloved and broken

He heals the wounded soul

We are beloved and broken

Your kingdom come

Your will be done

Make us whole

 

By Chris Yeager

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12 thoughts on “Broken and Beloved

  1. Love the line “marked by grace”…..what a great picture! Not the mark of the beast, but the Mark of Grace! Praise His Name!

    I’m thinking Debbie’s got an idea there….a little melody and your wonderful poem becomes a song.

    • Thanks Kate! It is good to know that His grace marks us as His. As far as it being a song, I will have to talk to some of my musician friends and see what they think.
      Blessings,
      Chris

  2. Time issues prevent me from reading most of the communications I receive, but I love your blog and always look forward to reading it. Your homilies inspire me to search my heart and sometimes change my behavior. I particularly enjoy your incorporation of your family experiences into your biblical interpretations and explanations. You have a true gift and I appreciate the time you spend and the hard work you do to share it. Thank you.

  3. “Broken and Beloved,” Beloved and Broken, an alliterative paradox. So far so good. Folowed by an edifying, discursive progression. But I don’t find a unifying metaphor pulling it all together imaginatively. And imaginative metaphor is the essence of poetry.

    Have you ever read the Catholic poet, Anne Porter? Garrison Keilor read her poem “Music” on the air in his “Writer’s Almanac” and I was so struck by it (and its coming from my bete noire, Keillor) that I bought her 2006 book “Living Things.” Here’s a link to an appreciation of her work from the WSJ, 2007 http://oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2007/03/28/anne-porter-an-easter-lily-in-the-field-of-late-blooming-poets/

    • Thanks for the critique, David. I would argue that spiritual poetry can assume a different essence for poetry, that being worship. This poem was intended to be worshipful. When God is the overarching theme, poetry takes on a different purpose. Thanks also for the link.
      Blessings,
      Chris

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